Cooing, sitting up and crawling are signs that your baby is growing. Your baby’s vision has stages of development too, but usually there are no signs to mark the progress.

The American Optometric Association encourages parents to include a trip to the optometrist in the list of well-baby check-ups. Assessments at six to twelve months of age can determine healthy development of vision. Early detection of eye conditions is the best way to ensure your child has healthy vision for successful development—now and in the future.

InfantSEE® (www.infantsee.org) is a public health program designed to ensure that eye and vision care becomes an integral part of infant wellness care to improve a child’s quality of life.

Under this program, member optometrists provide a comprehensive infant eye assessment within the first year of life as a no cost public health service.

One in every 10 children is at risk from undiagnosed eye and vision problems, yet only 13 percent of mothers with children younger than 2 years of age said they had taken their babies to see an eye and vision care professional for a regular check-up or well-care visit. Moreover, many children at risk for eye and vision problems are not being identified at an early age, when many of those problems might be prevented or more easily corrected.

An InfantSEE® assessment between six and twelve months of age is recommended to determine if an infant is at risk for eye or vision disorders.

Since many eye problems arise from conditions that can be identified by an eye doctor in the infant’s first year of life, a parent can give an infant a great gift by seeking an InfantSEE® assessment in addition to the wellness evaluation of the eyes that is done by a pediatrician or family practice doctor.

InfantSEE® is a first-of-its-kind national program to provide children professional eye and vision care earlier in life. The program addresses the early childhood segment of the pre-school population, providing no-cost infant eye and vision assessments before the age of one year.

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